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The scene from J.W.Anderson's recent show in London.



The Freshest Highlights From London Men's Fashion Week

As each day passes, lines of gender conformity are coming to a blissful blur, making the entire future existence of gendered fashion weeks uncertain. Brands are inching towards mixed gender shows, and some disregard the concept of gender entirely– meaning that eventually, this transition is going to topple and transform the industry schedule. Get ready to re-write your fall plans! But within the restricted parameters of what “men’s fashion” means, designers–or rather, creative masterminds–have mapped out their stories at London Men’s Fashion Week. Check it check it.

Craig Green

Green displays a fascination with uniforms, changing them through creative construction. The designer cracks open standardized silhouettes, fabrics and fastenings, transforming standard garments into a whirlwind of innovation. He’s redefined layers on layers. Stay warm!

Wales Bonner 

Regardless of your gender, the beauty of precision and craftsmanship in this collection will have you in awe. Mark your calendars for the day that designer Grace Wales Bonner’s incredible head adornments hit the stores. Inspired by Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie, Bonner’s work embodies class and elegance, the silhouettes demonstrating a combination of poise and power. She’s sure to be a fashion mainstay.


What is the modern take on fantasy? Is it still having a Prince Charming return your glass slipper, after a night filled with sparks and magic? Not according to Anderson. Fueled by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s whimsical world of The Little Prince, Anderson generates an army of characters, with crowns, oversized Dr. Seuss-style sweaters, all with the vision of a mad scientist.


A photo posted by J.W.ANDERSON (@jw_anderson) on

Aitor Throup

Throup never considered himself a fashion designer, but rather, a “storyteller.” He’s determined to reject runway culture. Set in a secular church in Marylebone, his show was divided into ten separate acts of performance, called “The Rite of Spring/Summer/Autumn/Winter.” These pieces, or as Throup likes to say, “trans-seasonal prototypes,” were made up of a steel puppet, controlled by a group of puppeteers in white masks, and utility inspired outfits. According to WWD, the pieces will be sold at London’s Dover Street Market from Tuesday, June 14 – July 6, followed by a commercial collection based on this work, which is promised to be released by January 2017.

It's alive. @aitor_throup's New Object Research is reborn

A photo posted by i-D (@i_d) on

Alexander McQueen

Ah, McQueen. The great designer may be gone, but his namesake collections still absolutely slay. This season was inspired by a combination of British military attire wrapped under a 60’s silhouette, married with traditional Indian prints and embroidery techniques, representing the majestic style of the Maharajas. The beauty of the collection lies in the genderless approach in fusing the two cultures, from men accessorized in delicate nose rings, to pastel pink henna style prints. Simply another Masterstroke by McQueen.

A detailed look at the Alexander McQueen menswear SS17 collection. The journey of the menswear collection begins in 1960s swinging London and moves to a dusty exotic world. Traditional, sharply cut Savile Row tailoring in sober shades gradually becomes more exotic and opulent, inspired by India during the Empire period, where the palette and iconography is fully embraced, from safari colours to sun-bleached leopard prints and exotic landscapes to ornate embroideries. Jewellery fit for a Maharaja referenced the lavishness of the time and the spirit of the 60s adds a dandified irreverence to the collection. Link in bio to discover the full collection. Music: "Bahar" Composed by Zakir Hussain #AlexanderMcQueen #LCM

A video posted by Alexander McQueen (@worldmcqueen) on

Stay tuned to Milk for more menswear

Image via The New York Times

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